24.08.2022

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Multilingual jobs and skills ontology: what is the added value for companies?

A jobs and skills ontology allows to link of all the HR objects of an organization thanks to a common language: skills. But how well does this approach work in an international context? Does this tool help to meet the challenges of career management even when HR objects are expressed in different languages? Let’s take a closer look at how the multilingual job and skills ontology works and its advantages.

 

 

Multilingual jobs and skills ontology: what is it?

 

A multilingual jobs and skills ontology enables organizations to adopt the ontological approach on a global scale.

 

→ Jobs and skills ontology: definition

 

A jobs and skills ontology is an intelligent system that describes concepts such as jobs, skills, training or even candidates, and that allows to highlight the relationships between them thanks to a common reading key: skills.

 

Related: Jobs and skills ontologies: operating principles and key impacts

 

 

Multilingual jobs and skills ontology: what technology does it rely on?

 

The multilingual jobs and skills ontology relies on mapping and matching algorithms that are able to exploit textual content written in several languages.

 

  • Mapping algorithms

 

Mapping algorithms are natural language processing algorithms used to normalize and organize jobs and skills data. They are based on BERT model, which is capable of recognizing words and phrases in more than 100 languages.

 

These semantic analysis algorithms make it possible to associate skills with all HR objects, regardless of the language in which they are written.

 

 

  • Matching algorithms

 

Matching algorithms are based on the results obtained during mapping, i.e. the “translation” of HR objects into skills. They allow to identify for any job or group of skills (extracted from a CV, training, etc.) the most relevant HR object(s) within a given set, and provide the results in the desired language.

 

Hence, the results can be expressed in the original language of the content or in another language available in the database. For example, it is possible to match a CV in Italian with a job description in French or training content in English.

 

Related: AI and HR: What are NLP techniques used for? (part 1)

 

Good to know: 

Boostrs’ jobs and skills ontology includes 27 languages to provide international organizations with a common language that can interconnect all the jobs and skills data of their business units, wherever they are located.

 

 

What are the benefits of a multilingual jobs and skills ontology for organizations?

 

A multilingual jobs and skills ontology is a powerful to address the international career management challenges of organizations: recruitment, internal mobility, training and strategic workforce planning.

 

Optimize international recruitment

 

The multilingual jobs and skills ontology helps improve international recruitment. Indeed, this intelligent system helps companies to better target their needs, by identifying more easily the skills held by their employees on a international scale.

 

Secondly, the multilingual ontology allows them to ensure that the skills held by candidates really correspond to those required for the positions to be filled, regardless of the language in which they are expressed in their CV or in the job description.

 

Related: Why put data at the heart of your recruitment strategy?

 

 

Creating career paths on an international scale

 

The multilingual jobs and skills ontology promotes the linking of jobs on an international scale. By being able to identify the possible bridges between all of the organizations’ jobs, regardless of the language in which they are described, this intelligent system highlights the areas of possible mobility between the different geographical areas where companies are located.

 

Moreover, by relying on the skills required by the business lines, the multilingual jobs and skills ontology facilitates the evaluation of career development opportunities by measuring the proximity between the skills held by employees and those required to occupy the recommended functions.

 

Related: How to successfully develop your internal mobility

 

 

Highlighting individualized training paths for all employees

 

The multilingual jobs and skills ontology helps highlight training needs and recommendations for employees globally, and improves their learning experience by increasing the match between the training content and their needs.

 

Whether employees need to upgrade their skills in job A, take up a new position in job B, or retrain for job C, this intelligent system can proactively identify potential skill gaps between two jobs in any language and suggest appropriate training paths for employees.

 

This approach makes it possible to optimize the actions implemented on a global scale, both from the point of view of the learner’s experience and from the point of view of the company’s performance, because the more the training is adapted, the more the company optimizes the ROI of its training strategy.

 

Related: Is your training offer relevant?

 

 

Designing global strategic workforce planning

 

The multilingual jobs and skills ontology is a great help for global strategic workforce planning. It provides an overview of the skills held by organizations in order to identify their current needs and anticipate their future needs to achieve their goals.

 

The multilingual jobs and skills ontology enables companies to implement the necessary actions to reduce potential skill gaps, but also to reduce the costs related to external services or recruitment, by promoting the deployment of mobility, upskilling and reskilling on a global scale.

 

In addition, the dynamic aspect of the multilingual jobs and skills ontology facilitates the preparation and implementation of these actions by allowing organizations to adapt to their transformations and those of their market.

 

Related: AI and HR: Why use NLP techniques? (part 2)

Illustration credits: https://www.istockphoto.com/fr/portfolio/MarinaSolva